Managing Mondays

Wine Wednesdays

Cashew Wine

A Different Kind of Wine

On a brief visit to Roatan Honduras, a port of call that the ship I was working on was visiting, I decided to visit one of the resorts. On our way there, which was early in the morning, the guide on the bus was pointing out the many floras and faunas they have. All their exotic fruits he was mentioning, and the cashew wine that they produce. mmmm. Wait. What? Cashew Wine? What is this I said to myself? But he wasn’t elobarating so much, so I wanted to ask. What was this Cashew Wine from Honduras? 

Image from the internet. Not mine

The Cashew nut tree is very prominent in Honduras, especially in the South. This wine is fermented from the juice of fresh Cashew fruits, grown  in the village of Namasig├╝e in  southern Honduras. It has a rich aroma and embodies the character of its exotic parent tropical fruit. He said that the most prominent is the Acax├║ wines, and they are on the dry side, drier than the ones produced in Goa, India and Belize. Oh, so other places make cashew wine too! And then he said that they have been making it for a number of years too! Wow! How come I didn’t know about this!?

The fruit of the cashew tree is an accessory fruit and is called the cashew flower, with a strong sweet taste and smell. In Honduras they have a dry cashew wine, however in Belize for example, it is considered a sweet wine. Either way, it is better served cold. Many also say that it is like a Port wine as it is quite strong in taste. The wine is made from the cashew apple pulp, which is very fruity and juicy, said to have notes of mango, raw green pepper and a little hint of grapefruit. Cahew wine is made through the distilling of the Cashew Apple juice. It was normally crushed with feet for maximum juice extraction, however, there are also new machines that they have now been using, due to the high demand. Fermentation lasts for 3 days, and normally takes place in copper pots.

Image from the Internet. Not mine

It is not as common and popular in the US and Europe and it gets quite expensive to get the licence to distribute, however, if you have a chance to visit Honduras or Belize, be sure to try cashew wine. Taste new flavors of wine, and compare to grape wine. In a time were more and more people are aware of their surroundings, nature, and opting to be vegan, gluten free and so much more, wine like cashew wine offers a great alternative and an even greater taste for those who choose it.

Cashew wine. Who knew?! I was very grateful to have learned something new and interesting, in a place I had never been to. Next time you are eating a handful of cashews, remember where they come from, and that their cashew flower fruit is now a cashew wine! Cheers to you!