Wine Wednesdays

Wine Wednesdays

An awesome time at the Vineyards of Torres Wines

The Long tradition of wine making from the Torres Family

While in Barcelona for a few days on work, I was invited to go on a wine tasting tour at La Torres Winery. What do you think I responded, when asked if I wanted to go or not? Well of course I said that I would definitely go! Boy was it the most awesome time at their huge and impressive vineyards, vinification center, cellars and wine tasting place!

The train takes you to a few of their vineyards and the wine guide explains in a lot of detail, certain processes, climate, temperature, topography and so much more. Their vineyards have been spanning through a lot of different areas in Spain, which has given them the amazing amount of different flavors and wine textures.

Established in 1870 by Jaime Torres, the 5th generation of the Torres family now takes great care of the huge and successful wine company that they have created. Torres wines are extremely popular around Europe, and wether you are a wine connoiseur or someone that enjoys wine while eating at a restaurant, you have for sure come across wines from Torres.

That was one of the few reasons I was excited to visit them, as Torres wines were a few of my first wines that I had grabbed hold of at home in Malta.

The cellars and the vinification systems were stupendous, and the undergound cellar was spectacular. I wanted to set a desk and a bed right there, so that I could work and sleep in front of that gorgeous view.

However, it was time for our wine tasting, and the venue and the view did not disappoint again. We started with the whites.

There were 3 whites, but the Las Mulas stood out for me with its rich taste. It could fo very well with most fish dishes amd lean white meat. I loved it, just as I loved their rose wine. It was so fresh and had a great berry taste.

Next, was 4 red wines. Yesss!! Red is my favorite, and I could say that they were all my favorite. There uniques taste were all do satisfying to the palatte. The Rioja wines were amazing and Celeste was a team favorite.

It was time to leave this beautiful place, but I wouldn’t think twice to going again and experience it all over again.

Happy Wednesday!

Cheers!

Managing Mondays

Wine Wednesdays

Cashew Wine

A Different Kind of Wine

On a brief visit to Roatan Honduras, a port of call that the ship I was working on was visiting, I decided to visit one of the resorts. On our way there, which was early in the morning, the guide on the bus was pointing out the many floras and faunas they have. All their exotic fruits he was mentioning, and the cashew wine that they produce. mmmm. Wait. What? Cashew Wine? What is this I said to myself? But he wasn’t elobarating so much, so I wanted to ask. What was this Cashew Wine from Honduras? 

Image from the internet. Not mine

The Cashew nut tree is very prominent in Honduras, especially in the South. This wine is fermented from the juice of fresh Cashew fruits, grown  in the village of Namasigüe in  southern Honduras. It has a rich aroma and embodies the character of its exotic parent tropical fruit. He said that the most prominent is the Acaxú wines, and they are on the dry side, drier than the ones produced in Goa, India and Belize. Oh, so other places make cashew wine too! And then he said that they have been making it for a number of years too! Wow! How come I didn’t know about this!?

The fruit of the cashew tree is an accessory fruit and is called the cashew flower, with a strong sweet taste and smell. In Honduras they have a dry cashew wine, however in Belize for example, it is considered a sweet wine. Either way, it is better served cold. Many also say that it is like a Port wine as it is quite strong in taste. The wine is made from the cashew apple pulp, which is very fruity and juicy, said to have notes of mango, raw green pepper and a little hint of grapefruit. Cahew wine is made through the distilling of the Cashew Apple juice. It was normally crushed with feet for maximum juice extraction, however, there are also new machines that they have now been using, due to the high demand. Fermentation lasts for 3 days, and normally takes place in copper pots.

Image from the Internet. Not mine

It is not as common and popular in the US and Europe and it gets quite expensive to get the licence to distribute, however, if you have a chance to visit Honduras or Belize, be sure to try cashew wine. Taste new flavors of wine, and compare to grape wine. In a time were more and more people are aware of their surroundings, nature, and opting to be vegan, gluten free and so much more, wine like cashew wine offers a great alternative and an even greater taste for those who choose it.

Cashew wine. Who knew?! I was very grateful to have learned something new and interesting, in a place I had never been to. Next time you are eating a handful of cashews, remember where they come from, and that their cashew flower fruit is now a cashew wine! Cheers to you!

Wine Wednesdays

Wine Wednesdays

Wine Tasting

How Can you Learn from Wine Tasting?

If like me, you like to learn about wine and are always in search of getting to know new wines and flavors, wine tastings are very beneficial.

There are several different styles of wine tasting, however, it is protocol to have a few wine samples provided from the same producer or the same winery, or even different samples of whites, reds, blends and rosés. Wine tasting is the sensory examination and evaluatuon of wine and became more popular after the 14th Century.

There are 4 Stages to Wine Tasting. First is the appearance of the wine, the color and thickness, then, the aroma of the wine in the glass, hence why you smell the wine before you taste. Thirdly is the in mouth sensation; what is the flavor, what hints does it have and how much does it appeal to your pallatte. Lastly, is the after taste. I am a big fan of the after taste. I find it very important that after I drink the first sip, that the after taste is very prominent.

By evaluating those four steps, by practise and knowledge, you will start being able to establish the complexity and character of the wine, its potential to be suitable for aging or drinking, and any possible faults. During several wine tastings, you will be able to compare the quality of wine and thier price with others, the region and counrty of the wine, their type of fermentation and aging and even any remarkable or unusual characteristics. 

Some more complex wine tastings happen blindly, called Blind tasting, especially when someone is trying to purchase wine for their esytablishement. They might have favorites and in order to not be biased, they will taste them without knowing the making and the winery.

Wine Tastings are definitely beneficial and are provided in every country and region. It helps you grow your wine knowledge and to make great choices when you are choosing your wines. If you are doing it for fun, it is a great social builder and a friend and team builder, however don’t expect to go there and start drinking out of control. It is only a sip or two each wine, so that you can evaluate new and interesting wines.

Go on, try a wine tasting near you and I guarantee you would want to go on more! Cheers!

Wine Wednesday's

Wine Wednesdays

An Introduction to Wine

What is the Origin of Wine?


 

Wine. Who doesn’t know a little bit about wine?

For my first Wine Wednesdays, I want to let you know how long wine has been around. We need to go back to more than 4000 BC, however, there have been findings in China from 7000 BC. Now it might sound strange when the Chinese have been known to not really drink wine, even though it is slowly growing in popularity,

 

 

However, back to the 4000 BC, in Armenia. That’s where the oldest winery was found. Pretty impressive! It was actually part of their religion.

The wine boom came in the 15th century though, and with it, the European expansion. With the popularity, came better quality wine. I do not want to imagine how it tasted back then!

The first seed that was used was called the Vitis Vinifera Vinifera, a grape that is still used today.

 

As wine kept on growing in popularity, the love of wine started growing and now we have millions of wine, wineries and so many countries producing exquisite tasting wine. We have so many grape varietals, climates, topography, climate and countries to choose from when we are choosing our wine, to say the least.

 

After its origin, and its first few hundreds of years, it was extremely popular in Egypt, Persia, Phoenicia, mainly Lebanon (who still until now produce some great wine), the Roman Empire and the Greek Empire, famous for Bacchus Dionysus. In those times of ruling and empires, wine was mainly for the higher up classes, Kings and Queens, gods and their empires. Take a look at some Game of Thrones episodes, and you always see wines in their palaces and places of ruling. It was part of their meals, part of their gatherings, a big part of the victories and celebrations. And even until this very moment, we see wine being enjoyed in celebrations, weddings, events, family and friends gatherings, birthdays, or simply a life achievement or a new opportunity. Wine comes in many different varietals, names, colors, tastes and flavors, and every Wednesday my intention is to bring you more information about wine and everything around it. Wine lovers, see you next Wednesday! Until then, I raise a glass to you and Salut!

Oh yeah, and I do tend to drink a glass of wine when I am writing about wine! Yep! Cheers to you all!